Expecting: Stories for Advent

Expecting: Stories for Advent

We have entered into Advent, the time marked off in the Christian calendar when we pay attention to the miracle of the incarnation.

Advent comes from the Latin adventus, which means coming or visit. Advent means that God has come to us in the person of Jesus. And that is not all, for the first advent anticipates the second advent to come. Jesus has come and is coming. If hope has a history, it also has a future.

But let us not move too fast. Before the coming there is the waiting. Waiting is inherent to the Christian story, just as it is deeply at the core of human experience. The point is to learn how to do this well, to wait with hope. This is God’s story to tell and to complete.

Abraham:

Abraham:

Abraham

We love the Biblical stories. We love what they do for us and in us.

This fall we follow the wanderer Abraham, the “father of many” and the “father of faith”, who “went, not knowing where he was going”. Abraham was living his response to the voice which had told him (past) to “go” from his home country, and to journey (present) to the land God would (future) show him.

The writer Thomas Cahill suggests that those little words — “Abraham went” — are two of the boldest words ever written. They mark a departure from the cycle of never-ending sameness which defined that world, the cycle of repetition it seemed impossible to break out of. But in obedience to the call, Abraham began to move towards the possibility of something new, something unseen yet promised.

And so we wander these weeks with our father Abraham, seeing his story and ourselves in his story. Abraham shows us what it means to “walk by faith, not by sight”. All of God’s children who walk by faith are, in this sense, children of Abraham.

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Genesis 11:31-12:1 - Jeremy Duncan

Discussion Notes


Genesis 12:4-20 - Jeremy Duncan

Discussion Notes


Genesis 13 - Jeremy Duncan

Discussion Notes


Genesis 14-15:6 - Jeremy Duncan

Discussion Notes


Genesis 15 - Jeremy Duncan

Discussion Notes


Genesis 18:20-19:29 - Jeremy Duncan

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Genesis 21 - Devon Scott

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Genesis 22 - Jeremy Duncan

Discussion Notes


likeJESUS

likeJESUS

Brad Jersak writes:

“What is God like? Toxic images abound: God the punishing judge, the deadbeat dad, the genie in a bottle—false gods that need to be challenged.

But what if, instead, God truly is completely Christlike? What if His love is more generous, his Cross more powerful, and his gospel more beautiful than we’ve dared to imagine? What if our clearest image of God is the self-giving, radically forgiving, co- suffering Love revealed on the Cross? What if we had ‘A More Christlike God’?”

That’s it. That’s our imagination as a church. To become a community that looks like Jesus, so that we can serve a God who looks like Jesus, and prepare to participate in a kingdom that looks just like Jesus. As we launch into our second year together as Commons Church we want to take the start of the season to refocus our community, theology, and participation on Jesus.

Discussion Notes:
Part 1 – the generic god
Part 2 – the power god
Part 3 – the comfortable god

The Other Guys

The Other Guys

Major Theology from the Minor Prophets

For our summer teaching this year, we are taking time to look at the twelve prophets known as “minor”. That doesn’t mean that they were insignificant, and especially not that they were short of stature. It just means that, in contrast to the long-winded and many worded Isaiah, Jeremiah, Daniel and Ezekiel, these guys kept their words brief and to the point.

But what lives they led! And what messages they gave! This summer its likely you will be both surprised and enlightened.

5 Questions From the Lord's Prayer

5 Questions From the Lord's Prayer

We now live in a post-Easter world. Jesus, the light that came into the darkness, has given us a new life. But how can we live this new life? By what strength, and in what power?

Prayer is perhaps the most precious and most under-utilized gift we have. For a multitude of reasons, people who follow Jesus often struggle with it. And the more capable you think you are, the bigger the struggle. Perhaps this is because we fail to see the deep practicality of prayer, the deeply connected way it can reorder our lives. Perhaps we need to look at life, and ourselves, in a new way.

In this series we want to imagine the Lord’s prayer as  ve questions we can ask daily. We want to take the practice of talking to and being with God, and see this way as something solid and tangible, something daily, something that matters to our experience of life.
If you have grown a little stale in your personal prayers, this series promises to re-energize what is most basic. Prayer is more practical than you ever dreamed.